Microsoft Launches $5000 Azure Credit for Nonprofits

Mark Berry August 11, 2016

If you assist nonprofits with their I.T. needs, you may have noticed a flurry of announcements made in January about Microsoft’s plans to donate “$1 billion of cloud computing resources over the next 3 years to serve the public good” (from this official blog post).

I’ve been watching the Microsoft philanthropies home page for a while. Regarding Azure, it only says “coming soon”:

Azure for Nonprofits 1

Now here’s the trick:  ignore the “coming soon.” Scroll to the bottom of that page and choose Get Started:

Azure for Nonprofits 2

Follow the instructions to get a TechSoup Validation Token. If you’ve already validated your nonprofit status with TechSoup, this is simply a matter of visiting this page, choosing your country and language, and signing in with your TechSoup member ID. Copy a current validation token (create one first if needed), then back on the Microsoft site, enter the token it on the Sign In page.

A page comes back listing your available benefits. At the bottom of the page, I found Azure available as a benefit with a $5000 annual credit for this U.S.-based nonprofit. I’ve already signed up on their behalf, so now it shows the benefit as active:

 

Azure for Nonprofits 3

Signing up took only a few minutes, including getting back the welcome email. After that, you create a new Azure account from this link. A credit card is required in case you go past your $5000 limit. The Azure account now shows the $5000 balance:

Azure for Nonprofits 4

A Microsoft representative explained that Azure for Nonprofits started its “soft launch” on August 3 and that it will roll out more broadly in September. Although the credit expires after one year, he said they plan to do an “annualized refresh,” i.e. this is a perpetual donation, not just a first-year-free promotion.

You can do a lot with $416 a month in Azure credits. That’s more than enough to run a couple servers in the cloud and still have plenty left over to pay for storage, backups, etc. Thanks, Microsoft, for helping support nonprofits!

Update 3 October 3 2016

An astute reader submitted this September 26 blog post by

Bringing more cloud power to serve nonprofits

 



7 Comments

  1. Rick   |  August 12, 2016 at 8:07 pm

    Do you see any way that Azure credit could be used for Azure AD Premium, Intune, or maybe even EMS?

  2. Mark Berry   |  August 13, 2016 at 12:15 pm

    Looks like all of that is part of Enterprise Mobility, available at a discount to non-profits but not free: https://www.microsoft.com/about/philanthropies/product-donations/products/enterprise-mobility/. If you sign up for Azure, you’ll have the opportunity to open a ticket for an onboarding session. They could give you more specific answers.

  3. Rick   |  August 13, 2016 at 10:13 pm

    Yes, unfortunately there’s a clause in the sponsorship email that eliminates a whole swath of things: “Special pricing does not apply to Microsoft Azure support plans, third-party branded products, products sold through Microsoft Azure Marketplace, or products otherwise sold separately from Microsoft Azure (for example, Active Directory Premium).”

    We got pretty close to getting the credit, but it fails on the last step, the MS link that has you create the Azure subscription. It’s quite odd, as it says “This offer is not available for your account,” even though we’re using the very account mentioned in the email. Perhaps it’s not completely up and running yet. We contacted support, so might hear back.

  4. Mark Berry   |  August 13, 2016 at 10:23 pm

    Are you trying to apply the credit to an existing Azure account? I created a new Azure account _after_ getting the credit email. Actually, I did it during the onboarding call a couple days later, so yes, there could have been some time provisioning. Let us know if you get it sorted out.

  5. Rick   |  August 13, 2016 at 10:36 pm

    Yes, the “account ID” mentioned in the email (the email mentioning $5,000, etc), which is also the address that Techsoup knows. It should have been a slam-dunk, since, if anything, it should have been less confusing for Azure than if we’d used an account that they weren’t expecting, like you did. The MS email even says “Create a new subscription on the Microsoft Azure Sponsorship offer by clicking on this link and sign in with your account ID above.” That account ID is the email we’re trying.

    We didn’t go the onboarding route like you, so there definitely could be a time element here, but either way we’ll find out soon enough, and I’ll report back. Thx.

  6. Rick   |  August 18, 2016 at 8:35 am

    It took a couple days, but support got it worked out. The issue was that the account we were trying to use was from an “older platform” when they’ve since migrated to a “newer platform.” So the account needed to be “flipped” by the engineering team to that platform. That all sounds pretty odd, but all’s well that ends well.

  7. Mark Berry   |  August 18, 2016 at 8:43 am

    Rick, thanks for the follow-up. Glad to hear you got it sorted! And that support knew what to do…

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